Watering Grass Seed

Grass-Seed-Lawn-Lawn-N-Order Landscaping

 

Labor Day is the time to aerate and overseed your lawn with grass seed. This gives the grass seed time to germinate and get well established before frost and freezing temperature hits and otherwise puts the seed into dormancy. With the dry summer in WNC, there’re some extra precautions to enable your grass seed to germinate. Without water, the seeds will die.

grass seedWatering recommendations for Lawns

We recommend giving your lawn a drink at approximately one inch of water a week. To measure this, set several cups out in the area you are watering and watch how long it takes to fill up 1 inch. Use that as a measured time to water.

Grass Seed Germination Time

Seed takes between 10-14 days for tall fescue and shade blends to germinate. The soil surface must stay moist at all times but not sopping wet. If the soil dries out, the grass seed will die. A gentle stream (not hard blasts) will keep the seed in place. If the grass seeds move or float away, then back off on the amount of pressure that’s applied and or length of time watered. Several times a day might be appropriate with the summer heat still lingering. Seeds will not sprout all at once because some may be buried at different depths and absorb water differently since you may have a blend in your yard of sun and shade. Just remember to keep the surface area constantly moist for all the seeds to germinate. Until the planted area is showing lots of new green growth, keeping watering.

Grass Seed & Automatic Timers

We recommend setting automatic timers for 5-10 minutes, early in the morning and again at mid-day. If you are watering by hand, it must be grass-grass-seed-lawnconsistently applied and use the light rain gauge on your spout handle.

Watering the grass can be a tedious task, but before long the lawn will be lush and green. Scheduled fertilization for the soil health will also give your lawn the added nutrients need for a healthy root system. We have a four and a seven system program that we offer in addition to the aeration, dethatching and overseeding.  Call us today for more information. 828.774.1590

May your grass be greener on your side of the fence!

Three Lawn Care Treatments to Perform

 

To keep your lawn healthy and green these three lawn care treatments will give the lawn roots good health and maintenance. September is the time for dethatching, aerating and overseeding.

Lawn Care: Dethatching

Each time the lawn is cut particles of grass pieces gather and decompose on the top layer of the soil. Nutrients break down, and the thatch decomposes, lawn care-landscaping-turfimproving soil health. If the thatch doesn’t decompose fast enough due to prolific growth and numerous cuttings, a buildup begins to occur that could impede and create a barrier. This barrier could rob the soil of moisture and oxygen. Spots in the lawn will die if the turf isn’t getting sufficient hydration and oxygen. To alleviate this, dethatching is performed by lifting up this debris with a power rake and removed.

Lawn Care: Aeration

Aerating the soil with a machine will pull plugs of soil from the surface. The plugs are left to decompose on the soil’s surface. This treatment helps loosen compacted soils from heavy traffic and rains. The coring allows air and water to reach the root system.

Lawn Care: Overseeding

For a variety of reasons, lawns will weaken with heat stress, lack of soil health, thatch buildup, compaction or disease. Open patches of soil will result. Overseeding the lawn after these lawn treatments aids in prepping the soil so the seed can germinate.

Watering After Seeding

If Mother Nature doesn’t cooperate with adequate rain, a manual or automated method is recommended to get a lush, healthy, green lawn. To sprout, newly lawn care-landscaping-lawn stripessown grass seed needs to stay moist. Germination time for fescue blends ranges from 10-14 days. The soil that is in contact with the seed needs to stay at an even moisture in order not to dry out and prevent germination. Sprinklers with a broad range tied to automatic timers can be set up to water 5-10 minutes in the morning and again in the afternoon. Watering twice daily is essential for the seed to germinate and get a sufficient root system started. Be careful to avoid over-watering or creating puddles on the surface of the soil to prevent water carrying off the seed. This will create further damage to the existing grass by preventing available oxygen from getting to the roots. On a slope, it gets trickier as seed can easily move downward. Observe the amount of water pressure that is hitting the seed and if it is creating any movement and adjust. Consider the amount of shade and sun each area receives and adjust the watering needs accordingly. Ensure your watering sprinkler system is hitting all areas. Uneven watering will create uneven patches of growth.

These three lawn care treatments along with others throughout the year on a regular basis will be any gardener’s envy. If you are in need of these or other services, we offer, call for a consultation today and get on our annual maintenance lawn care schedule.

 

Landscape Calendar—How to Keep the Garden Healthy and Blooming

Landscape Calendar

Everyone has a calendar on their phone or computer with appointments and reminders of important events but do you have a landscape calendar? If you’re as busy as a bee, you have to schedule it on the calendar or you’re liable to forget! That’s when a landscape calendar comes in handy. From year to year, we forget what the chore list is and when we’re supposed to get the job done. To keep your investment in the ground growing and not wilting or dying prematurely, we have listed a comprehensive garden task list that will keep the bees buzzing as well.

Landscape Calendar:

January:

  1. Clean, condition, lubricate and repair garden tools.
  2. Cut back ornamental grasses
  3. Apply Early Spring Pre-emergent Crabgrass Control
  4. Buy summer blooming bulbs.
  5. Get the lawn mower serviced before the rush!
  6. Organize tool shed and gardening tools.
  7. Inspect garden chemicals and make a list of things to buy.
  8. Look through seed catalogs and make a list for purchase.
  9. Look at your landscape while the leaves are off. Are there any spots that need filling in or additions, changes? Make notes and startpruning limbs-landscape calendar
  10. Prune out dead, damaged and diseased wood in trees (not fruit) and shrubs to prevent bark tearing and damage to the plant.
  11. Fill bird feeders and keep clean.

 

February:

  1. Add manure, compost or fertilizer around shrub roots and trees before mulching.
  2. Apply Early Spring Pre-emergent Crabgrass Control
  3. Add soil conditioners to the soil such as gypsum and Calcitic lime if needed.
  4. Sow seeds under lights according to germination directions.
  5. Cut back dead perennial foliage.
  6. Spray early season dormant spray if needed.
  7. Removed dead wood off rose bushes, seal cuts.
  8. Order summer bulbs.
  9. As hostas emerge, spread broken eggshells around the base to prevent slugs and snails.
  10. Fertilize bulbs at the first sign of emergence.
  11. Prune butterfly bushes to 1 ft. from the ground. Prune back summer and flowering shrubs for new shoots (i.e. Beautyberry, Caryopteris, Rose of Sharon)
  12. Prune roses.
  13. Mulch all beds before perennials emerge to keep the mulch at 2-3 inches in depth.

 

March:

  1. Cut back and prune dead shoots, damaged and diseased limbs on trees (fruit trees too) and shrubs.
  2. Plant and/or fertilize the pansies and voilas.
  3. Spread pre-emergent herbicide (corn gluten or Preen) on your garden beds to prevent weeds.  Caution: do not spread of flower seeds are germinating.
  4. Fertilize the perennials with slow release fertilizer or compost that are emerging out of the ground.
  5. Spread mulch around perennials as they emerge if not before to provide protection and prevent weeds from germinating.
  6. Clean up the leftover dead leaves and flower heads at the base of plants and shrubbery (i.e. Camilla’s)landscape calendar-watering plants
  7. Fertilize shrubbery with a slow release fertilizer or compost.
  8. Examine shrubbery and trees for pests and treat.
  9. Apply Early Spring Pre-emergent Crabgrass Control
  10. Add soil conditioners to the soil such as gypsum to soften the clay soil and add calcium.
  11. Begin to weed all areas of the garden.
  12. Mulch all beds to keep the mulch at 2-3 inches in depth.
  13. Blow off and remove leftover leaves and debris before mulching and dispose of in compost pile.
  14. Cut back died perennials that were not tended in February.
  15. Do not trim spring flowering shrubbery until after blooming has ended.

 

April:

  1. Use a slow-release nitrogen fertilizer on summer bulbs.
  2. Cut back dead stems on bulbs or foliage on any lingering perennials.
  3. Set out annuals after last frost day (usually Mother’s Day weekend in WNC)
  4. Walk through the garden and watch out for any pests
  5. Propagate tip cuttings of herbaceous perennials. Divide or transplant before blooming begins.
  6. Watch rose bushes for mildew and fungus and treat.
  7. Prune flowering hedges and shrubs after bloom.
  8. Weed the garden after a soaking rain. It will make it easier to pull up the roots if thoroughly soaked.
  9. Prepare container gardens by washing out the pot, filling with drainage material and new soil and fertilizers.
  10. Treat lawns with middle spring fertilizer and broadleaf weed control.
  11. Seeding and overseeding, thatching and aeration can be done this month. Don’t overseed if pre-emergent has been spread.
  12. Finish mulching all areas that have not been mulched to this point.
  13. Soil tests can be taken and sent to the NC state extension office.
  14. Spraying herbicide on poisonous and invasive weeds can be started once the temperatures reach 70°F.
  15. Finish the fertilization of all trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals.

May:

  1. Water plants and containers assuring each plant have the needed amount. Check the soil to assure the water is penetrating down into the root system after several minutes of watering. Note how long it took to get this deep penetration.
  2. Weed and monitor for pests.
  3. Stake tall perennials that become floppy with grow-through supports.
  4. Plant seeds after all threat of freeze are over.
  5. Plant summer-flowering bulbs (gladiolas, dahlias, caladiums)
  6. Deadhead tulips and daffodils (Do not remove foliage until it turns yellow.)
  7. Apply Late Spring soil builder and broadleaf weed control. Add iron.
  8. Prune spring flowering shrubs after flowering.
  9. Stake and secure perennial vines for support. Remove dead stems on clematis and shade the root zone.landscape calendar-perennials-deadheading
  10. Pinch back asters and mums for fall flowering.

 

June:

  1. Order spring bulbs for fall planting.
  2. Fertilize perennials and deadhead.
  3. Weed the garden and water in needed places.
  4. Record observations in the garden for record keeping. i.e. How much mulch was ordered? What was planted? What pests to look out for in the garden?
  5. Pinch back numerous perennials to make stems/buds: Artemisia, Asters, Mums, Echinacea, Gaillardia, Russian sage, Phlox.
  6. Propagate perennials to multiple.
  7. Fertilize containers and deadhead.
  8. Replace spring annuals with summer plants for coverage.
  9. Start early summer fertilization and weed control.

 

July:

  1. Water and fertilize flowering containers.
  2. Deadhead perennials.
  3. Divide irises and daylilies after bloom.
  4. Watch and monitor roses for disease and pests and treat.
  5. Sit and enjoy your garden in the shade!
  6. Start summer fertilization and broadleaf weed control application.
  7. Add compost over summer flowering bulbs for an extra boost.

 

August:

  1. Water and fertilize flowering containers.
  2. Deadhead perennials.
  3. Do no pruning or fertilizing of shrubs this month.
  4. Add to and fluff tired container gardens. Water and fertilize.
  5. Remove all dead limbs and debris from summer storms.
  6. Overseed lawns.
  7. Edge the lawn beds this month to maintain a distinction between the lawn and the garden beds. container garden-cobblestone pavers-landscape design-Asheville

 

September:

  1. Apply bulb fertilizer to daffodils and tulips.
  2. Plant spring bulbs. Divide daylilies and distribute.
  3. Weed and water.
  4. Check for garden pests and treat.
  5. Clean up garden as perennials die.
  6. Record notes in a garden journal.
  7. Cut back lavender to ½-1/3 after blooming. Avoid cutting woody stems.
  8. Plant trees, shrubs and perennials to get their roots established during the fall and winter season.
  9. Plant winter containers with evergreens and berries.
  10. Seed, overseed, thatch and aerate.
  11. Add soil builders to the lawn. No weed control for germinating grass seed.
  12. Remove leaves from the lawn and dispose into a compost pile.

 

October:

  1. Divide perennials.
  2. Mulch perennial beds and water deeply.
  3. Clean garden and cut back and dispose of debris in a compost pile.
  4. Plant spring flowering bulbs. (crocus, daffodils, snowdrops, grape hyacinths and tulips)
  5. Plant pansies and ornamental cabbage for annual color and display.
  6. Water thoroughly before the first freeze.
  7. Add the fall and pre-winter fertilization application to the lawn (no weed control)
  8. Add the required amounts of lime to the lawn.
  9. Take soil samples and mail to the state extension service.
  10. Weed as needed.
  11. Remove leaves from the lawn and dispose into a compost pile.

 

November:

  1. Drain, disconnect and store hoses and timers. Winterize watering system. Protect outside faucets with covers.
  2. Clean, sharpen and repair garden tools.
  3. Apply the last fall and pre-winter fertilization application on the lawn if it wasn’t completed in October.tulips-spring garden chores-landscape calendar
  4. Plant spring flowering bulbs to a depth equal to 4 times the bulb height.
  5. Remove all fruit from under bushes and fruit trees on the ground.
  6. Remove leaves off the lawn each week and dispose of.
  7. Remove dead, damaged and diseased limbs before winter.
  8. Water containers and plants consistently to prevent desiccation from cold temps and the wind.

 

December:

  1. Fertilize annuals sparingly in the garden with calcium nitrate.
  2. Spread mulch over any barren spots in the garden beds.
  3. Finish the last clean up and dispose of debris in the compost pile.
  4. Cut perennial grasses back.
  5. During heavy winter snowdrifts, sweep off heavy loads off shrubbery to prevent limb breakage.

 

 

Hopefully, the bees will be buzzy in your garden as you create a little movement of your own. Before long, your plants will be flushed out, blooming and the bulbs will be multiplying. And while the blood, sweat and a few drops of water are shed, we are certain your garden will grow with this consistent landscape calendar! If you have thrown away your work clothes and need help in the garden, give us a call and a regular maintenance contract can be set up. It will give more time to stop and smell the roses!

How to Make Life Easier with Lawn Care

Got grass but no time to cut it? We can make life easier! We have a dedicated crew for lawn care and are taking new clients. Whether you need a simple cut, trim and blow or something more substantial, we’re here to meet your needs.

lawn-grass-maintenance-yardTo ensure you have a green lawn with no hassles this summer, follow some helpful tips from Ryan:

1. Sharpen your blades on the lawn mower to guarantee and clean, sharp cut. Doing this will prevent diseases to your grass.

2. Wash the belly of your mower after use to prevent the spread of weed seeds throughout the yard.

3.  Practice safe cutting  by only removing 1/3rd of the height of the grass. If more is removed, brown patch and other funguses can proliferate.
If you need lawn care maintenance, sign up for one of our annual contracts! See our packages and choose the one that suits your needs.

Keep Your Lawn Off the Neighborhood Watch List

 

lawn care-maintenance-yard-Weaverville-Asheville

Lawn-N-Order Landscaping is expanding and has added another dedicated crew specializing in lawn care and maintenance. We have assigned a dedicated crew for all your lawn care needs. If you want to be on a regular schedule, please send us an email on our contact form and we will meet and give you an estimate for an annual contract. Annual contracts cover a variety of tasks including fertilization, overseeding and renovations, soil tests, thatching, aeration, cut, trim, edging, weeding, leaf removal, mulching beds, pruning shrubbery and deadheading perennials, fertilizing shrubs and trees, garden bed clean-up seasonally, and monitoring pests with IPM standards.

Packages

All Points Bulletin (a.k.a. Deluxe Package)

Weekly cut, trim, edge
Early Spring Fertilize and Crabgrass control
Late Spring Broadleaf weed control and fertilizerpruning-trees-shrubs
Seasonal lawn fertilization
Seeding/Over-seeding
Thatching-1x
Soil testing 1x
Leaf removal
Pruning shrubbery
Fertilizing beds
Mulching beds
Garden bed cleanup
Weeding/Herbicide Apps
Lawn Insect Control Apps
Pest and Fungus monitoring and control

Safe House Package (a.k.a. Middle package)

Weekly cut, trim, edge
Seasonal fertilization of lawn in Spring and Fall
Seeding/Over-seeding
Thatching-1x
Soil testing 1x
Leaf removal

Undercover Operation (a.k.a. Basic)

Weekly cut, trim, edge

At Large Package (aka Custom)

Custom order from our vast variety of services.

We have deluxe, middle and basic packages or can customize a package for your individual needs. Contact us today to get on our weekly schedule and get your lawn ready for spring and summer activities with the family!

The Truth about Weed Barrier Mats

weeds-crabgrassWeed barrier mats are made of porous, plastic, woven sheeting to allow penetration of water to plant roots and prevent weeds from germinating. The idea behind weed matting is to suffocate the weeds and keep them from coming up through the mulch by applying this woven fabric on your garden beds. The fallacy is weeds still grow on top of the surface over time. The roots of the weeds extend down through the woven fabric and make them even more difficult to eradicate. When a weed is pulled in conjunction with this matting, the roots are locked into this blanket. Roots break off and the same problem exists.

Our solution is to eliminate weeds by carefully applying herbicide in accordance with the directions at the recommended rates. This will get to the roots, killing the plant and preventing propagation. If you prefer more organic methods, then pull the weeds (refer to Farmer’s Almanac for best days), after which apply a 3-4” base of mulch in landscape beds to hold in moisture and prevent weed seeds from seeing light and germinating. If you see patches of dirt in your beds, then weeds have a safe haven to grow. Applying fertilizer and organic matter will also present an unfavorable haven for weeds (as they prefer more compact, unhealthy soils).

If you need garden maintenance, please contact us and we’ll take care of the dirty work!

2014 Super Service Award from Angie’s List

Lawn-N-Order Landscaping Earns Esteemed 2014 Angie’s List Super Service Award

Award reflects company’s consistently high level of customer service

Lawn-N-Order Landscaping, serving the Asheville and surrounding area has earned the service industry’s coveted Angie’s List Super Service Award, reflecting an exemplary year of service provided to members of the local services marketplace and consumer review site in 2014.

Ryan Houston: “We accomplished this award in seven categories by keeping our Angie's List-Super Service Award-Asheville landscaperservices focused on quality, and by dealing with each property individually with focus on the end result.  We work with each client one on one, to come to the end result, being a property transformation that they are happy to pay for.  We do this by giving the customer a turnkey operation with attention to detail, and better than what was expected.”

Founded in 2000 as Houston Landscaping, Lawn-N-Order Landscaping gives low maintenance landscape solutions in Western North Carolina

The business originated in 2000 under the owner’s name “Houston’s Landscaping.” With some flyers and a borrowed weed-eater, Ryan Houston began his business on a song and a prayer. One job lead to another one and his American dream was born founded from his love and interest of the outdoors. In 2003 the business name was changed to Lawn-N-Order Landscaping. Since the businesses inception, LNO works locally as well as in surrounding states (Virginia, Tennessee, South Carolina, Florida) and the Cayman Islands. We are passionate about our service and love to maintain the artistic attributes of nature through landscaping. Education is part of our life long commitment to excellence in our field to develop, expand and educate ourselves on improved techniques and thus improving our service to clients. Experienced, uniformed and qualified team members perform all of our work with a job supervisor on each project site.

The owner, Ryan Houston will personally consult, plan, propose and oversee most of the larger jobs. He is a WNC native and has twenty-four years experience with WNC plants and wildlife. Ryan is an accredited NC Licensed Landscape Contractor certificate #1933, one of less than 2000 ever in the history of North Carolina with only approximately 1000 of who are still active. He is also a Certified Plant Professional as well as completing rigorous testing from the State of North Carolina to achieve this certification. Ryan Houston and staff are also NC State Certified in the knowledge and application of pesticide and herbicide application making them knowledgeable about plant pests and diseases. This contributes to his overall knowledge of how to plant hardy and low maintenance landscapes that will thrive in the mountains of WNC. He specializes in dealing with sloping properties and hillside problems such as erosion, water runoff, and planting on steep slopes. Ryan and his crewmembers were awarded the ICPI Certification. They participated in two days of extensive training and review on interlocking concrete pavers. Lawn-N-Order holds the title of “ICPI Certified Installer’ and has met all the nationally recognized guidelines for interlocking concrete pavement installations. With Ryan’s client testimonials, you will see that he has excellently handled large projects and has several long-term fans for his rewards.

“Only about 5 percent of the landscape companies in Asheville/Buncombe County have performed so consistently well enough to earn our Super Service Award,” said Angie’s List Founder Angie Hicks. “It’s a really high standard.”

Angie’s List Super Service Award 2014 winners have met strict eligibility requirements, which include an “A” rating in overall grade, recent grade, and review period grade; the company must be in good standing with Angie’s List, pass a background check and abide by Angie’s List operational guidelines.

Service company ratings are updated daily on Angie’s List. Companies are graded on an A through F scale in areas ranging from price to professionalism to punctuality.