Landscape Calendar—How to Keep the Garden Healthy and Blooming

Landscape Calendar

Everyone has a calendar on their phone or computer with appointments and reminders of important events but do you have a landscape calendar? If you’re as busy as a bee, you have to schedule it on the calendar or you’re liable to forget! That’s when a landscape calendar comes in handy. From year to year, we forget what the chore list is and when we’re supposed to get the job done. To keep your investment in the ground growing and not wilting or dying prematurely, we have listed a comprehensive garden task list that will keep the bees buzzing as well.

Landscape Calendar:

January:

  1. Clean, condition, lubricate and repair garden tools.
  2. Cut back ornamental grasses
  3. Apply Early Spring Pre-emergent Crabgrass Control
  4. Buy summer blooming bulbs.
  5. Get the lawn mower serviced before the rush!
  6. Organize tool shed and gardening tools.
  7. Inspect garden chemicals and make a list of things to buy.
  8. Look through seed catalogs and make a list for purchase.
  9. Look at your landscape while the leaves are off. Are there any spots that need filling in or additions, changes? Make notes and startpruning limbs-landscape calendar
  10. Prune out dead, damaged and diseased wood in trees (not fruit) and shrubs to prevent bark tearing and damage to the plant.
  11. Fill bird feeders and keep clean.

 

February:

  1. Add manure, compost or fertilizer around shrub roots and trees before mulching.
  2. Apply Early Spring Pre-emergent Crabgrass Control
  3. Add soil conditioners to the soil such as gypsum and Calcitic lime if needed.
  4. Sow seeds under lights according to germination directions.
  5. Cut back dead perennial foliage.
  6. Spray early season dormant spray if needed.
  7. Removed dead wood off rose bushes, seal cuts.
  8. Order summer bulbs.
  9. As hostas emerge, spread broken eggshells around the base to prevent slugs and snails.
  10. Fertilize bulbs at the first sign of emergence.
  11. Prune butterfly bushes to 1 ft. from the ground. Prune back summer and flowering shrubs for new shoots (i.e. Beautyberry, Caryopteris, Rose of Sharon)
  12. Prune roses.
  13. Mulch all beds before perennials emerge to keep the mulch at 2-3 inches in depth.

 

March:

  1. Cut back and prune dead shoots, damaged and diseased limbs on trees (fruit trees too) and shrubs.
  2. Plant and/or fertilize the pansies and voilas.
  3. Spread pre-emergent herbicide (corn gluten or Preen) on your garden beds to prevent weeds.  Caution: do not spread of flower seeds are germinating.
  4. Fertilize the perennials with slow release fertilizer or compost that are emerging out of the ground.
  5. Spread mulch around perennials as they emerge if not before to provide protection and prevent weeds from germinating.
  6. Clean up the leftover dead leaves and flower heads at the base of plants and shrubbery (i.e. Camilla’s)landscape calendar-watering plants
  7. Fertilize shrubbery with a slow release fertilizer or compost.
  8. Examine shrubbery and trees for pests and treat.
  9. Apply Early Spring Pre-emergent Crabgrass Control
  10. Add soil conditioners to the soil such as gypsum to soften the clay soil and add calcium.
  11. Begin to weed all areas of the garden.
  12. Mulch all beds to keep the mulch at 2-3 inches in depth.
  13. Blow off and remove leftover leaves and debris before mulching and dispose of in compost pile.
  14. Cut back died perennials that were not tended in February.
  15. Do not trim spring flowering shrubbery until after blooming has ended.

 

April:

  1. Use a slow-release nitrogen fertilizer on summer bulbs.
  2. Cut back dead stems on bulbs or foliage on any lingering perennials.
  3. Set out annuals after last frost day (usually Mother’s Day weekend in WNC)
  4. Walk through the garden and watch out for any pests
  5. Propagate tip cuttings of herbaceous perennials. Divide or transplant before blooming begins.
  6. Watch rose bushes for mildew and fungus and treat.
  7. Prune flowering hedges and shrubs after bloom.
  8. Weed the garden after a soaking rain. It will make it easier to pull up the roots if thoroughly soaked.
  9. Prepare container gardens by washing out the pot, filling with drainage material and new soil and fertilizers.
  10. Treat lawns with middle spring fertilizer and broadleaf weed control.
  11. Seeding and overseeding, thatching and aeration can be done this month. Don’t overseed if pre-emergent has been spread.
  12. Finish mulching all areas that have not been mulched to this point.
  13. Soil tests can be taken and sent to the NC state extension office.
  14. Spraying herbicide on poisonous and invasive weeds can be started once the temperatures reach 70°F.
  15. Finish the fertilization of all trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals.

May:

  1. Water plants and containers assuring each plant have the needed amount. Check the soil to assure the water is penetrating down into the root system after several minutes of watering. Note how long it took to get this deep penetration.
  2. Weed and monitor for pests.
  3. Stake tall perennials that become floppy with grow-through supports.
  4. Plant seeds after all threat of freeze are over.
  5. Plant summer-flowering bulbs (gladiolas, dahlias, caladiums)
  6. Deadhead tulips and daffodils (Do not remove foliage until it turns yellow.)
  7. Apply Late Spring soil builder and broadleaf weed control. Add iron.
  8. Prune spring flowering shrubs after flowering.
  9. Stake and secure perennial vines for support. Remove dead stems on clematis and shade the root zone.landscape calendar-perennials-deadheading
  10. Pinch back asters and mums for fall flowering.

 

June:

  1. Order spring bulbs for fall planting.
  2. Fertilize perennials and deadhead.
  3. Weed the garden and water in needed places.
  4. Record observations in the garden for record keeping. i.e. How much mulch was ordered? What was planted? What pests to look out for in the garden?
  5. Pinch back numerous perennials to make stems/buds: Artemisia, Asters, Mums, Echinacea, Gaillardia, Russian sage, Phlox.
  6. Propagate perennials to multiple.
  7. Fertilize containers and deadhead.
  8. Replace spring annuals with summer plants for coverage.
  9. Start early summer fertilization and weed control.

 

July:

  1. Water and fertilize flowering containers.
  2. Deadhead perennials.
  3. Divide irises and daylilies after bloom.
  4. Watch and monitor roses for disease and pests and treat.
  5. Sit and enjoy your garden in the shade!
  6. Start summer fertilization and broadleaf weed control application.
  7. Add compost over summer flowering bulbs for an extra boost.

 

August:

  1. Water and fertilize flowering containers.
  2. Deadhead perennials.
  3. Do no pruning or fertilizing of shrubs this month.
  4. Add to and fluff tired container gardens. Water and fertilize.
  5. Remove all dead limbs and debris from summer storms.
  6. Overseed lawns.
  7. Edge the lawn beds this month to maintain a distinction between the lawn and the garden beds. container garden-cobblestone pavers-landscape design-Asheville

 

September:

  1. Apply bulb fertilizer to daffodils and tulips.
  2. Plant spring bulbs. Divide daylilies and distribute.
  3. Weed and water.
  4. Check for garden pests and treat.
  5. Clean up garden as perennials die.
  6. Record notes in a garden journal.
  7. Cut back lavender to ½-1/3 after blooming. Avoid cutting woody stems.
  8. Plant trees, shrubs and perennials to get their roots established during the fall and winter season.
  9. Plant winter containers with evergreens and berries.
  10. Seed, overseed, thatch and aerate.
  11. Add soil builders to the lawn. No weed control for germinating grass seed.
  12. Remove leaves from the lawn and dispose into a compost pile.

 

October:

  1. Divide perennials.
  2. Mulch perennial beds and water deeply.
  3. Clean garden and cut back and dispose of debris in a compost pile.
  4. Plant spring flowering bulbs. (crocus, daffodils, snowdrops, grape hyacinths and tulips)
  5. Plant pansies and ornamental cabbage for annual color and display.
  6. Water thoroughly before the first freeze.
  7. Add the fall and pre-winter fertilization application to the lawn (no weed control)
  8. Add the required amounts of lime to the lawn.
  9. Take soil samples and mail to the state extension service.
  10. Weed as needed.
  11. Remove leaves from the lawn and dispose into a compost pile.

 

November:

  1. Drain, disconnect and store hoses and timers. Winterize watering system. Protect outside faucets with covers.
  2. Clean, sharpen and repair garden tools.
  3. Apply the last fall and pre-winter fertilization application on the lawn if it wasn’t completed in October.tulips-spring garden chores-landscape calendar
  4. Plant spring flowering bulbs to a depth equal to 4 times the bulb height.
  5. Remove all fruit from under bushes and fruit trees on the ground.
  6. Remove leaves off the lawn each week and dispose of.
  7. Remove dead, damaged and diseased limbs before winter.
  8. Water containers and plants consistently to prevent desiccation from cold temps and the wind.

 

December:

  1. Fertilize annuals sparingly in the garden with calcium nitrate.
  2. Spread mulch over any barren spots in the garden beds.
  3. Finish the last clean up and dispose of debris in the compost pile.
  4. Cut perennial grasses back.
  5. During heavy winter snowdrifts, sweep off heavy loads off shrubbery to prevent limb breakage.

 

 

Hopefully, the bees will be buzzy in your garden as you create a little movement of your own. Before long, your plants will be flushed out, blooming and the bulbs will be multiplying. And while the blood, sweat and a few drops of water are shed, we are certain your garden will grow with this consistent landscape calendar! If you have thrown away your work clothes and need help in the garden, give us a call and a regular maintenance contract can be set up. It will give more time to stop and smell the roses!

7 Steps to ‘Re-leaf’

Those leaves hanging off the branches will soon be down on the ground so here’s some expert advice on getting some ‘re-leaf’ for the situation!

  • Before you start the regular lawn mowing regiment, put on your safety gear including ear and eye protection. A respirator is recommended too when working with leaves to guard against the aggravation of mold and dust kicking up. (Yes, that means you, macho man!)
  • We recommend using a heavy duty (preferably gas powered backpack blower with a flexible hose and variable speed triggers) to blow all the leaves out of the beds and leave-cleanup-removalinto the lawn area.
  • Obviously it will be prudent to pick a day when the leaves are dry for better mobility.
  • Set the height of your mower blades to the highest they will go. Using mulch blades on your lawn mower will pulverize the clippings and leaves and they will drop back into the turf to decompose and add nutrients to the soil.
  • Go over the leaves multiple times with the mulcher blades to disperse around the lawn making sure the tiny bits of leaves are pulverized and easier to decompose faster.
  • If there are too many leaves and they are covering your grass blades to an extent that it would smoother, then stop! Rake part of the shredded leaves onto a tarp and relocate into your garden beds for a great layer of mulch that will decompose over the winter and leave decomposed ‘black gold’ for you to dig through next spring. Planet Natural claims that one pound of leaves contains “twice the mineral content of manure.”
  • Do this weekly to provide a better end result during the decomposition process.

As the leaves start to change and fall, start with this easy regiment to keep ahead of the game. If leaves make you sneeze, then you can contact us or call and get on our fall calendar for leaf cleanup at 828.774.1590.

Keep Your Lawn Off the Neighborhood Watch List

 

lawn care-maintenance-yard-Weaverville-Asheville

Lawn-N-Order Landscaping is expanding and has added another dedicated crew specializing in lawn care and maintenance. We have assigned a dedicated crew for all your lawn care needs. If you want to be on a regular schedule, please send us an email on our contact form and we will meet and give you an estimate for an annual contract. Annual contracts cover a variety of tasks including fertilization, overseeding and renovations, soil tests, thatching, aeration, cut, trim, edging, weeding, leaf removal, mulching beds, pruning shrubbery and deadheading perennials, fertilizing shrubs and trees, garden bed clean-up seasonally, and monitoring pests with IPM standards.

Packages

All Points Bulletin (a.k.a. Deluxe Package)

Weekly cut, trim, edge
Early Spring Fertilize and Crabgrass control
Late Spring Broadleaf weed control and fertilizerpruning-trees-shrubs
Seasonal lawn fertilization
Seeding/Over-seeding
Thatching-1x
Soil testing 1x
Leaf removal
Pruning shrubbery
Fertilizing beds
Mulching beds
Garden bed cleanup
Weeding/Herbicide Apps
Lawn Insect Control Apps
Pest and Fungus monitoring and control

Safe House Package (a.k.a. Middle package)

Weekly cut, trim, edge
Seasonal fertilization of lawn in Spring and Fall
Seeding/Over-seeding
Thatching-1x
Soil testing 1x
Leaf removal

Undercover Operation (a.k.a. Basic)

Weekly cut, trim, edge

At Large Package (aka Custom)

Custom order from our vast variety of services.

We have deluxe, middle and basic packages or can customize a package for your individual needs. Contact us today to get on our weekly schedule and get your lawn ready for spring and summer activities with the family!

The Truth about Weed Barrier Mats

weeds-crabgrassWeed barrier mats are made of porous, plastic, woven sheeting to allow penetration of water to plant roots and prevent weeds from germinating. The idea behind weed matting is to suffocate the weeds and keep them from coming up through the mulch by applying this woven fabric on your garden beds. The fallacy is weeds still grow on top of the surface over time. The roots of the weeds extend down through the woven fabric and make them even more difficult to eradicate. When a weed is pulled in conjunction with this matting, the roots are locked into this blanket. Roots break off and the same problem exists.

Our solution is to eliminate weeds by carefully applying herbicide in accordance with the directions at the recommended rates. This will get to the roots, killing the plant and preventing propagation. If you prefer more organic methods, then pull the weeds (refer to Farmer’s Almanac for best days), after which apply a 3-4” base of mulch in landscape beds to hold in moisture and prevent weed seeds from seeing light and germinating. If you see patches of dirt in your beds, then weeds have a safe haven to grow. Applying fertilizer and organic matter will also present an unfavorable haven for weeds (as they prefer more compact, unhealthy soils).

If you need garden maintenance, please contact us and we’ll take care of the dirty work!

Steps to Tree Stump Removal Made Easy—

If you’re having a few trees removed, now is a good time to consider what to do with the stump removal-land clearing-lot-landscaperstump. If it is a small tree, sometimes the stump can be removed with a shovel. For the bigger jobs, here’s a tip. When cutting the tree, leave 3-4’ of tree sticking up from the ground instead of chopping off at ground level, especially if a building project is planned for the area. This will make it a snap for a sizable tracked excavator machine or bulldozer to grasp the timber section of the stump protruding from the ground to remove. This will alleviate future time and expense for building contractors forming driveways, roads and foundations.

If the trees have been previously cut to the ground level, not to worry. A little extra heavy-duty machinery can come to the rescue! We use our skid steer loader and track excavator backhoe to dig around the sides of the stumps, drop the bulging stump into the loader bucket and haul to our trucks to remove from the area. Fill dirt and grading are also part of the services we provide. If you need stump removal and big machinery to get the job done, call Lawn-N-Order Landscaping at 828.712.1590.

Preparing the Site Before Land Clearing

lot-land clearing-debris-cleanup-property development

Unless you’re building on a cow pasture with no trees in sight, you will want to prepare the site before a land clearing crew arrives. Walking the land with your architect, landscape designer and contractor will be prudent during this foundational process. As professionals with experience, they can advise the best views, environmental advantages and avert potential hazards while making financial recommendations that will save money, time and headaches later. After this meeting, prepare with these tips:

  1.  Consider the house footprint and other buildable areas to clear. These should be marked off clearly with neon paint or tape. (i.e. driveways, septic tank and leach fields, wells, garages, outdoor patios, fire pits)
  2.  Property boundaries should be marked clearly for land clearing.
  3.  Consider the road access for construction and heavy excavation machinery for land clearing on the property. Where will it be stored daily to not constrict traffic flow?
  4.  Protect trees that will not be cleared by taping off around the tree out to the drip edges or beyond. Compaction of the soil in these areas around the roots will deprive it of oxygen and bring about death. In addition, piling soil or debris around a tree or its root system will also kill the tree.

For a consultation with us, use our easy contact form online to schedule an appointment. We’d love to talk to you about your land/lot clearing needs and to educate you on other proper procedures to ensure your land is treated with environmental delicacy when land planning. Our forestry mulcher and chipper can leave your lot and land clear with no environmental damage occurring. Call us today at 828.712.1590.

 

 

Lot and Land Clearing Bidding Process and Questions to Consider

Before land clearing, some considerations have to be in place before a contractor and crew start clearing. When hiring a landscape contractor ask yourself these questions in order to clarify what exactly you want them to do. You will be better prepared to compare apples with apples in the lot and land clearing and bidding process. Each landscape contractor may have a different vision for what a lot should look like afterwards but may not measure up to your expectations. Consider these factors in the bidding process:

  1.  What do you want the lot to look like when it’s cleared? (Having photos of
    299 d CAT-grapple bucket-land clearing

    The grapple bucket attachment mounted to our 299D CAT xhp devised to lift trees, rocks, logs, brush, culverts and more up to 4500 lbs.

    other cleared lots will help explain your vision.)

  2.  Do you have valuable timber on your property and do you need to contact a lumber broker for resale?
  3.  What happens with the trees, debris and large stone after clearing? Is it hauled away, piled out of site or burned?
  4.  What about drainage on the site? Do you have any or anticipate any potential drainage issues?
  5.  Are there zoning, HOA covenants, restrictions or permits required before the job can start?
  6.  What areas do you want to be cleared and preserved?
  7.  Are there view scapes to consider and how will they be cut out?

We are equipped to handle the production of lot and land clearing with our machinery for this type of work. Our equipment includes a 299D CATxhp mulcher with clearing head on skid steer loader, a Woodsman 18x Chipper with winch and drag loader equipped with a rolling wheel, a grapple bucket attachment to lift and maneuver weighty, awkward size materials, a Kubota track hoe with thumb and Kubota BX-24 tractor with backhoe. You are guaranteed a fast, efficient thorough job leaving your property clear, clean and void of mess and debris ready to build, plant or develop.

If you’re ready to discuss your property needs with a professional, call our office at 828-712-1590 or contact us online to schedule a consultation.

Seven Autumn Garden Tips

garden tips-landscaper-lawn-n-orderBefore winter sets in and you get too cozy by the fire, take some time to stroll through the garden to do these last minute chores. Just doing these will help preserve your garden while it sleeps through the winter and prevent damage to your beloved plants.

  1. Snow and rain can cause leaves to mat down and smother the grass. So be sure to rake away those accumulating leaves! Even those blown over from your neighbor’s yard and garden. Just pay it forward!
  2. You can continue to plant pansies and snapdragons for winter and early spring color. The plants may look a little wilted on cold days, but as soon as the sun warms them, they perk right up. Fertilizing with Osmocote after planting will keep them blooming throughout the cold months and give them a boost for spring in your garden.
  3. Now is a great time (October) to use dormant or sun oil to treat scale on your trees and shrubs. As long as the weather isn’t extremely cold, spray now to smother the scale on the leaves and stems. This will keep your garden healthy.
  4. Planting new shrubs and trees in the garden will give them time for the roots to get established before the plant breaks dormancy and begins the work of producing foliage and flowers.
  5. Keep your waterfalls and water features running or install an aeration device to keep water feature-aeration-landscaper-Ashevillethe surface from freezing. A solid surface of ice over the water feature will trap harmful gases under the surface and harm the fish.
  6. The weight of ice and snow can seriously damage your evergreens. Take a broom and gently brush off ice and snow. If damage occurs, call us, and we will recommend a course of action to save the specimen.
  7. Keep a garden journal. Make notes of plants you want to replace, transplant or change in your garden for the upcoming season. Record what worked and didn’t work. Then note it on your calendar and give us a call when spring arrives.